Treasure Hunting
118 plays

Here is a song that I wrote last semester called Bitterroot - definitely the most emotionally-charged song I’ve written

I shared during this year’s farewell banquet about this past semester and I mentioned that one of the biggest struggles I faced oldie year was bitterness towards other people. As much as I hate to admit it, I get bitter very easily towards others. Sometimes it dies with one good night’s rest, other times it robs me of that sleep for days. 

Regardless, God has shown that the bitterness of my heart is undoubtedly linked to my self-idolatry. Instead of asking God to help me fight bitterness, I stew in conclusions I’ve drawn from my incomplete knowledge of the situation. Instead of reconciling with others, I balk in fear of the possibility that whatever conclusions I’ve drawn about these people in my head (apart from actually talking to them…) may be wrong. Instead of learning to love them in a Christ-like way, I imply through my actions, “My friendship with you is not worth my discomfort.”

But graciously, God is not against hurting me to show me the condition of my heart so that I may be saved by His hand. He shows me that bitterness towards others is not love for Him. It separates me from Him when I indulge in it, like persistently chewing on a withered bitterroot.

There’s more, but I’ll leave it at that for now haha. I hope this song is a blessing - not by offering a solution to bitterness but a nudge towards seeking God if you are struggling with it.

Bitterroot
The more that I eat of you
The more I forget
The sweet taste of honey on my lips

Bitterroot
You make me feel better
Than everybody else
Why can’t they agree with what I see

But someone I met the other day
Said my body is the bread of life, so put that root away
And I might hate Him for a little while
But I hate you more
O LORD, keep this bitterroot from choking me with thorns

Bitterroot 
You are what you eat
When I think I’ve had enough of you to fill me
Another bite won’t kill me at all

Bitterroot
My close friends agree
You’re not as sneaky as you think you are
Their pain cries, ‘What have you done to me?’

When I am eating, I’m bleeding love

::edit::

So just to clarify, this song is more emotional - that’s why I have a lyric here that does imply that “I might hate” Jesus but WAIT IT’S NOT TRUE. I only say that to illustrate how strongly my sinful heart rebels against God when He initially begins sanctifying me. I hope it’s contextually clear but if it wasn’t - I don’t hate Jesus, I love Him.

I was honestly struggling through this video………but very bold and insightful for a comedy website

I think it even speaks to how the accessibility of immediate satisfaction through media can affect how we perceive joy in God

I dare you too - watch this video

97 plays

aaand another beat that I made last night using a really strange sample by Teebs - LSP

This one was really neat because I picked up my bass for the first time in years and just jammed out for an hour before landing on the two riffs I used in the beat (one clean, one distorted)

Enjoy!

Download here

135 plays

Here’s a new beat that I made last night and finished up today! Very simple jazz sample taken from Bill Evans - Elsa that reminded me of when it’s sunny and raining at the same time, hence the title of the song.

Enjoy!

Download here

(I forgot to add a dl link to the house of the LORD cover so I’ll do that now too)

191 plays

Per request of some Bethany people (and because I do have a lot of time these days) here’s a recording of House of the LORD, because I’ve been told that there’s no actual recording out on iTunes or Spotify

I long to live in Your house, O LORD
I long to sit here at Your feet
And let Your words be the food I eat
The food I eat

I long to live in Your house, O LORD
To dine at the table with my King
And give to You the praise I bring
The praise I bring

For here in Your house, I find Your embrace
You’ve set on my head a garland of grace
When I lift my hands, You fill me with more
Oh I long to live in the house of the LORD

I hope it’s a blessing to you guys!

::edit::

Download heree

125 plays

This is a song I wrote over the course of this semester in light of my difficulties and struggles in those 3-4 months, and it’s basically my stripped-down take on Psalm 73.

I was gonna delve into my thought process in writing it, but I wrote WAY too much and it’s late and I’ve been revising it for the past hour so bleh if you’re really curious I can explain on gchat or something whatever

I’m often left at sea
To save my sanity
Though my pride has left me stranded
You show that You never abandon Your own

So I’ll trust in You, my God
With every step
Help me trust in You

These caverns stretch too long
In vain have I pressed on?
You put out the torches made by man -> (Is. 50:10-11)
And You lead me by my hand to glory

Whom do I have in heaven but You?
And there is nothing on earth I desire, no greater worth

Good stress - the stress of repentance and growth, of reflection and discovery. 

Only by God’s abundant grace and mercy are we blessed with such a thing, even though at that exact moment(s) of its heaviness we want it gone so so badly. He does it for His glory; He does it for our good and our joy, in order that both of those things may be found in Him.

May it scare and alarm us if that stress ever vanishes

eugenekwon:

californian - or could we say american? - christianity is thoroughly infected by an idolizing of comfort that kills faith slowly and with a smile. we spend all day, all week, all year, and ultimately our entire lives looking for a chance to unwind, to relax, to empty our minds of our concerns and…

In light of PSteve’s sermon on self-righteousness two weeks ago, I really recommend this sermon by Charles Spurgeon to anyone whom God has convicted of the deep sin of pride and self-reliance.

A difficult blessing to me, and I hope the same to anyone who reads as well.

I officially declare Peace Corps service year 2 as the year of “not taking any sh*t”. Last year I was more inclined to just smile and go along with whatever was happening no matter if I was offended, confused or annoyed. This year, no more Ms. Nice Girl! I will chase you down in the bus station…

This was a really big encouragement and challenge to me. Thanks Nicolette I hope your time in Ethiopia has been a blessing and that you remember that our God is faithful to work all things for good. Have hope! (Romans 8:18-30)

jtotheizzoe:

Every Birdy Must Get Stoned
Gizmodo has a fascinating and mildly creepy story about Tanzania’s Lake Natron titled “Any Animal That Touches This Lethal Lake Turns to Stone.” It features the haunting black and white photos of Nick Brandt, who placed the calcified carcasses of dead fauna in “living” poses above the alkaline salt lake that was the likely cause of their demise. The whole gallery’s got a very “Weeping Angels" vibe to it, eh?

There’s just one catch. Lake Natron shouldn’t really be called a “lethal lake”, because not every living thing that touches it turns to stone. But it is one of the most interesting bodies of water on this here planet, and a very important one, if you happen a flamingo.
Lake Natron is fed from underground hot springs, which keep its temperature near 50-60˚C. The shallow lake also has an extremely high pH, approaching that of an ammonia solution (pH 10-11). This is because of the high levels of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate that are dissolved in its sweltering waters, along with a host of other mineral salts. 

It’s those mineral salts that give the lake its name (“natron" is another name for a mix of soda ash and other minerals) and its rather lethal reputation. Most animals know that it’s a good idea to avoid Natron’s caustic waters, on account of how bathing in ammonia is discouraged by 10 out of 10 dermatologists. Fail to heed that warning? Brandt’s photos show the consequence.
But as we have seen so many times, no matter how inhospitable a place on Earth may seem, Mother Nature operates strictly under what I call the Ian Malcolm Principle:

Numerous salt-loving algae call Lake Natron home, their pink and red hues staining the serene saline slough a shade of reddish orange:

This color (let’s call it “roseblood”) is common in salt lakes around the world, perhaps most famously in Australia’s Hutt Lagoon, which glows Pepto-Bismol pink thanks to a microbe named Dunaliella salina:

But little pink microbial aliens aren’t the only biology that Lake Natron is host to. They attract a much larger form of life, one that shares the pink hue of its smallest residents: The lesser flamingo (Phoenicopterus minor):

Lesser flamingos feed on salt-loving pink algae, spirulina and other halophiles, filtering food as small as two hundredths of an inch in diameter using its unique filter-like beak. And like Goose (from Top Gun, not the bird), they do it while inverted. The skin on the flamingos’ legs has adapted specially to resist burns from this high pH water. It’s one of the more basic tales of evolution (puns!), if you think about it.
Lake Natron’s waters are so inhospitable to other animals (as Brandt’s photos demonstrate), that lesser flamingos have sort of cornered the real estate market. It’s their primary breeding ground. That means the future of their species literally depends on this place. Good thing they’ve got it all to themselves!

Except that they might not. Not for much longer, anyway. A few members of our own species see money in Lake Natron’s mineral deposits and want to set up industrial plants to extract them from the water. Tanzania’s government is pushing hard to build factories there. And that doesn’t even begin to include the effects that a changing climate could have on Lake Natron, flooding its delicate balance with excess rain, or drying it up completely.
It’s painfully ironic that the very chemistry that makes Lake Natron such a perfect home for the lesser flamingo, those same alkaline salts that have directed their evolution and the history of their whole species, could be the cause of the bird’s demise. If we aren’t careful, Brandt’s photos might foretell the future of one of the one animal that breathes life into this deadly lake.  

(painting by C.G. Finch-Davies)

incredible. this is too surreal, something out of a movie or fantasy

jtotheizzoe:

Every Birdy Must Get Stoned

Gizmodo has a fascinating and mildly creepy story about Tanzania’s Lake Natron titled “Any Animal That Touches This Lethal Lake Turns to Stone.” It features the haunting black and white photos of Nick Brandt, who placed the calcified carcasses of dead fauna in “living” poses above the alkaline salt lake that was the likely cause of their demise. The whole gallery’s got a very “Weeping Angels" vibe to it, eh?

There’s just one catch. Lake Natron shouldn’t really be called a “lethal lake”, because not every living thing that touches it turns to stone. But it is one of the most interesting bodies of water on this here planet, and a very important one, if you happen a flamingo.

Lake Natron is fed from underground hot springs, which keep its temperature near 50-60˚C. The shallow lake also has an extremely high pH, approaching that of an ammonia solution (pH 10-11). This is because of the high levels of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate that are dissolved in its sweltering waters, along with a host of other mineral salts. 

It’s those mineral salts that give the lake its name (“natron" is another name for a mix of soda ash and other minerals) and its rather lethal reputation. Most animals know that it’s a good idea to avoid Natron’s caustic waters, on account of how bathing in ammonia is discouraged by 10 out of 10 dermatologists. Fail to heed that warning? Brandt’s photos show the consequence.

But as we have seen so many times, no matter how inhospitable a place on Earth may seem, Mother Nature operates strictly under what I call the Ian Malcolm Principle:

Numerous salt-loving algae call Lake Natron home, their pink and red hues staining the serene saline slough a shade of reddish orange:

This color (let’s call it “roseblood”) is common in salt lakes around the world, perhaps most famously in Australia’s Hutt Lagoon, which glows Pepto-Bismol pink thanks to a microbe named Dunaliella salina:

But little pink microbial aliens aren’t the only biology that Lake Natron is host to. They attract a much larger form of life, one that shares the pink hue of its smallest residents: The lesser flamingo (Phoenicopterus minor):

Lesser flamingos feed on salt-loving pink algae, spirulina and other halophiles, filtering food as small as two hundredths of an inch in diameter using its unique filter-like beak. And like Goose (from Top Gun, not the bird), they do it while inverted. The skin on the flamingos’ legs has adapted specially to resist burns from this high pH water. It’s one of the more basic tales of evolution (puns!), if you think about it.

Lake Natron’s waters are so inhospitable to other animals (as Brandt’s photos demonstrate), that lesser flamingos have sort of cornered the real estate market. It’s their primary breeding ground. That means the future of their species literally depends on this place. Good thing they’ve got it all to themselves!

Except that they might not. Not for much longer, anyway. A few members of our own species see money in Lake Natron’s mineral deposits and want to set up industrial plants to extract them from the water. Tanzania’s government is pushing hard to build factories there. And that doesn’t even begin to include the effects that a changing climate could have on Lake Natron, flooding its delicate balance with excess rain, or drying it up completely.

It’s painfully ironic that the very chemistry that makes Lake Natron such a perfect home for the lesser flamingo, those same alkaline salts that have directed their evolution and the history of their whole species, could be the cause of the bird’s demise. If we aren’t careful, Brandt’s photos might foretell the future of one of the one animal that breathes life into this deadly lake.  

(painting by C.G. Finch-Davies)

incredible. this is too surreal, something out of a movie or fantasy